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Competition Entries Guy Gardner Hayden Pattullo Jason Johnson Public Art SSHRC Uncategorized

Floq

Date: 2017
Client: Edmonton Arts Council
Principal Investigator(s): Jason S. Johnson, Guy Gardner
Research Assistant:  Hayden Pattullo
Funding Agencies: SSHRC
Budget: N/A
Status: Proposal

The project is composed of a field of brightly coloured discs attached to a grid of thin wires in such a way as to allow the discs to flutter in the wind, reflect light and produce patterns on the spaces around them. The technique is such that we can experiment with various iterations of pattern and symbols in the consultation, design, and fabrication process. FloQ captures the ways in which we move and evolve cities and cultures in response to the one another and the conditions that surround us.

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Alex Wilton Arole Oluwaseyi Guy Gardner Jason Johnson SSHRC

Limenitis Wall

Date: 2016
Client: Emerald Hills Sports Pavilion
Principal Investigator(s): Jason S. Johnson, Guy Gardner
Project Budget: $32,000
Research Assistants/ Project Team:  Arole Oluwaseyi, Alex Wilton
Funding Agencies: Strathcona County, SSHRC
Status: Built

The Limenitis Wall takes its inspiration from the White Admiral butterfly, Limenitis Arthemitis, a large and highly contrasting black and white species commonly found East of the Rockies. The butterfly has historically functioned as a potent symbol for the metamorphosis of the human soul. We believe this is an apt metaphor for the dynamic and transformational qualities of the Emerald Hills Sports Pavilion in Sherwood Park, a growing community in Strathcona County, Alberta.

The work is composed of hundreds of custom milled, rolled and anodized aluminum components mounted to an exterior wall facing a public plaza. The components, flatcut using a CNC router and formed by hand, are of different sizes and occupy a diagrid with varying levels of subdivision. The components are anodized in black or clear, or are left in a raw state. The colouration and subdivision are driven by a parametric definition which uses multiple layers of image mapping to create a complex visual effect, which is amplified by the curving forms and variety of sizes, colours, and finishes. The combination of these elements plays with the viewer’s pattern recognition system to activate a sense of pareidolia, a response where we project our own meanings or interpretations onto complex formations, which is exemplified by the act of seeing faces in clouds.

The various elements of the work allows it’s appearance to change with different seasons and lighting conditions, and its meaning to shift depending on the viewer’s response. These dynamic forces of transformation combine to activate the façade of the emerald hills sports pavilion and the surrounding public plaza.

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Beth Tzedec Brady Horner Jason Johnson Joshua Taron Kristen Forward Matthew Parker SSHRC

Sukkah No. 5: Subject to Change

Date: 2016
Client: Beth Tzedec Congregation
Principal Investigator(s): Joshua M. Taron, Jason S. Johnson
Project Budget: $5,000
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Kristen Forward, Brady Horner, Matthew Parker
Funding Agencies: Beth Tzedec Congregation, SSHRC

This 8’x8’x8’ digitally fabricated object is the fifth in a series of five sukkahs designed and built by the LID for Calgary’s Beth Tzedec Congregation. The three Hebrew characters for “sukkah” are projected onto each set of parallel planes of the sukkah, which, when modeled in three dimensions form a space for social gathering.

The sukkah is designed to sit in any one of three positions thus allowing for different orientations from year to year. Constructed of urethane –coated CNC milled EPS foam chunks bolted together at aluminum plates, the sukkah is light weight and can be easily transported and assembled by a team of 4-6 people. With that same group, assembly or disassembly can be achieved in about 20 minutes without the need for skilled labor. These aspects of the design improve the design’s discoverability and allowed the project to achieve a high degree of precision without the involvement of costly building contractors.


The Laboratory for Integrative Design (LID) embarked on a five year long Sukkah project in collaboration with the Beth Tzedec Congregation in 2012. This video captures our journey through the celebration of the Jewish holiday across these five years and across five LID designed and built community Sukkahs. These Sukkahs experimented with parametric design and rule-based systems exploring scale and material in a tangible way while still communicating a religious framework tied to celebration and gratitude.
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Alex Wilton Arole Oluwaseyi Guy Gardner Jason Johnson Matthew Parker SSHRC

The Crest & the Crown

Date: 2016
Client: cSpace King Edward
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Alex Wilton,
Oluwaseyi Arole, Guy Gardner, Matthew Parker
Funding Agencies: SSHRC

“The Crest and the Crown” is a proposal for the King Edward School C-Space project that includes a chandelier and panelized ceiling installation, forming an entry sequence to the historic school. The ceiling panels are a mixed construction of CNC milled repurposed wood (removed during the renovation), inlaid brass, and milled translucent panels mounted to a modular dropped ceiling system. The panels use the icon of the school crest taken from a drawing in a historic school yearbook transform it. The modules are mirrored and arrayed along their axes’ to produce a combined pattern. The materials of brass and wood are inspired by details, furniture, and accents found throughout the historic building.

The Crown is imagined as a glowing object suspended above an entryway. It is constructed of stacked translucent panels lit from the interior, and visible from below and through a window between the vestibule and the entry stairs. It formally links the interior and exterior elements of the proposal. The Crown references the colonial iconography of the historic building, digitally simulated with restrained inflation and contouring. The proposal for the exterior elements uses a similar workflow of translating 2d- patterns derived from historical data into 3d form.

Categories
Alex Wilton Competition Entries Guy Gardner Jason Johnson Matthew Parker Public Art SSHRC Uncategorized

Columnulous

Date: 2016
Client: cSpace King Edward
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Guy Gardner,
Matthew Parker, Alex Wilton
Funding Agencies: SSHRC
Status: Proposal

“Columnulous” is a series of vertical monuments resembling cloud formations, acting as a threshold for entry to the public plaza at the south entrance of the building. Each column is formed in precast concrete and is intended to weather in place. Details from the original 1912 architectural drawings of the sandstone building were sampled and projected onto masses using digital software. By referencing instances from the façade which could be seen from the locations where the columns were placed, the goal was to subconsciously and indirectly draw the viewers’ attention to the patterns contained within the building elevation.

The projected lines were used as restraints as the masses were inflated using a physics engine. The process of inflation could be seen as a way of obscuring or “clouding” these details, so that the viewer could feel free to overlay their own interpretations of the form, in the same way that we project images onto clouds. Several iterations were developed to explore the extent to which the geometries and patterns should be obscured in order to allow for a range of associations.

The experience of interacting with these intentionally ambiguous forms encourages a similar procedure of projecting meaning onto the work. The objects can be read a number of ways at the same time. They resemble both soft, fluid forms, and rigid concrete monoliths. They operate in series and as single sculptural instances. The inscribed patterns reference the adjacent building, but are obscured.