Categories
Alex Wilton Anson Tse Beakerhead Christina James Guy Gardner Hayden Pattullo Jason Johnson Logan Armstrong Mariana Ibanez Matthew Parker Simon Kim SSHRC

Light Shells – Lamp Workshop

Date: 2016
Client: Beakerhead
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Project Budget: $1500
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Matthew Parker, Christina James, Logan Armstrong, Guy Gardner, Alex Wilton, Kim Tse, Hayden Pattullo
Funding Agencies: SSHRC, Beakerhead

Light Shells is a continuing exploration into thin shell structural assemblies.  The project team developed a number of strategies based on the surface breakdown techniques from the Sputnik and Nancy prototypes and stitching logics used in prior investigations.  A user interface was developed to allow for versioning of the project through variations in formal logics and surface articulation.

The project team then tested this interface on a number of groups with varying levels of design experience and exposure to generative digital tools.  The results shown here are from a two session workshop held in January of 2016.  The first session asked the 14 participants tasked with making a series of constrained design decisions that generate the lamps and their cut files.  In the second session participants assembled their lamps.  Assembly time varies from 1 hour to the full 3 hours allotted for completion.

Future workshops will introduce more variables into the design process and streamline the assembly to optimize the number of surface to surface connection points.

Categories
Beakerhead Canadian Heritage Christina James Jason Johnson Logan Armstrong Mariana Ibanez Matthew Parker Simon Kim SSHRC

The Ministers _ Nancy

Date: 2015
Client: Beakerhead
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Collaborators: Simon Kim, Mariana Ibanez
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Christina James,
Matthew Parker, Logan Armstrong
Funding Agencies: SSHRC, Canadian Heritage Foundation

Project Description: Part of an installation at Beakerhead 2015 called The Ministers, Nancy is an investigation of a self-supporting thin shell structure lit from within. The piece anchored the Beakernight event as an object to draw visitors into the space from the main street. This project was designed in collaboration with Mariana Ibanez and Simon Kim of IK Studio. The design focused on using various types of flat stock plastics to explore the limits of double curvature.

Categories
Beakerhead Canadian Heritage Christina James Jason Johnson Logan Armstrong Mariana Ibanez Matthew Parker Simon Kim SSHRC

The Ministers _ Sputnik

Date: 2015
Client: Beakerhead
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Collaborators: Simon Kim, Mariana Ibanez
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Christina James ,
Matthew Parker, Logan Armstrong

Project Description: Part of an installation at Beakerhead 2015 called The Ministers, Sputnik is an investigation of thin shell structures produced by conic geometries. This project was designed in collaboration with Mariana Ibanez and Simon Kim of IK Studio. The design team focused on iteratively prototyping this project across materials and techniques. The final object was produced in thin shell aluminum from flat sheet material.

Categories
Beth Tzedec Jason Johnson Meysam Ehsanian Oguendo Obinna Peyman Poostchi Ryan Cook

Sukkah 2015: Rubical Synthukkah

Date: 2015
Client: Beth Tzedec Congregation, Calgary
Principal Investigator:
Jason S. Johnson
Collaborator: Shaul Osadchey
Project Budget: $6000
Project Design/Build Team: Ryan Cook, Meysam Ehsanian,
Oguendo Obinna, Peyman Poostchi
Funding Agencies: Beth Tzedec Congregation

Project Description: Each year since 2012 a team of students has worked with the Beth Tzedec Congregation to design and build a sukkah. A sukkah is a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish festival of Sukkot. Students spend a semester designing an building the project in consultation with local Rabbi Shaul Osadchey.  These projects are part of a series of projects that seek out local communities interested in supporting design research in the area of computation and digital fabrication techniques.

RUBICAL SYNTHUKKAH is a transformative Sukkah that casts new light on the tradition of integrating nature with a temporary shelter for the Jewish festival of Sukkot. It embodies the significance of Judaic themes and ornaments such as the hexagram and the importance of kosher organics such as etrog, lulav, hadass, and aravah – the former is achieved primarily through a geometric exercise in rotation, while the latter is achieved through the use of synthetic material systems which capture and embed the geometric outlines of nature through light and texture.

The massing of the Sukkah is created by transforming two simple geometrical shapes: the triangle, which refers to the Star of David, and the hexagram, which has been abstracted in many traditional Sukkah designs. A hexagram is composed of two triangles with an angle of 60 degrees to each other. To combine these two shapes in the sukkah, a transformation is created as means of the quadrangle based on 60 degrees. This is the total angle which can be divided equally into four parts, with each being rotated an additional 15 degrees consecutively. Separately, these four rotational segments are representational of the etrog, lulav, hadass, and aravah. However, when composed into a whole mass which twists and forms a continuous loop, a broader relation reveals itself: highlighting a linear trend of history from the past to the present.

It is tradition for a Sukkah to cover the roof with natural materials, branches, and other organics which have been detached from the ground. RUBICAL SYNTHUKKAH explores this tradition through light, texture, and more specifically through techniques of folding, pinching, and twisting. The Sukkah uses a triple layer skin process that requires a layer of flexible 3mm plywood, a layer of detached branches, and a thin coating of white shrink wrap. The organics are placed underneath the shrink wrap and are then used as form guidelines. The surface is then further sculpted with the application of heat and finally by pinching, pulling, and twisting the material by hand. This results in a skin system that blurs the line between the natural and synthetic by creating a dizzying array of light and texture when illuminated from within.

Categories
Christina James Jason Johnson Joshua Taron Logan Armstrong Matthew Parker Nicholas Perseo SSHRC

FXAT SCREEN: RAIC Festival Pavilion

Date: 2015
Client: RAIC Festival/MBAC
Principal Investigators: Jason S. Johnson, Joshua M. Taron
Consultants:Entuitive (Engineering)
Project Budget: $20,000
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Matthew Parker,
Logan Armstrong, Christina James, Nicholas Perseo
Funding Agencies/Sponsors: SSHRC, CMLC, MBAC,
Meadow Sage Builders, Clark Builders, EVDS University of Calgary

Project Description: The Flat Screen TV seeks to reclaim the presence of architecture and its imagery in the public realm. CNC milled opaque plywood panels expose a depth to the otherwise thin planar surfaces revealing lit polyethylene panels beneath. This artificial topography is wrapped around a cantilevered form that addresses both the pedestrian corridor of Stephen Ave directly across and the RAIC Design Hub. A gradient of openings migrate across the form toward the street, concluding with a 14 x 7 foot rear projection screen showing the work of 15 young Canadian architecture firms in the RAIC’s Future Voice: Situating Architecture Exhibition curated by Marc Boutin of MBAC.

Given tight time and budget constraints we deployed a “rough cut” technique that exposed the seams of the panels and the material layers embedded in the marine plywood. This technique produces a contrast between the high definition images projected on the content surface and the rough nature of the milled surfaces.

Categories
Jason Johnson Kailey O'Farrell Max Senini Thiago Bueno

Sukkah 2014: Journey

Date: 2014
Client: Beth Tzedec Congregation, Calgary
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Collaborator: Shaul Osadchey
Project Budget: $6000
Project Design/Build Team: Max Senini,
Kailey O’farrell, Thiago Bueno,
Caitlyn Bidochka, April Battenfelder
Funding AgenciesBeth Tzedec Congregation

Project Description: Each year since 2012 a team of students has worked with the Beth Tzedec Congregation to design and build a sukkah.  A sukkah is a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish festival of Sukkot. Students spend a semester designing an building the project in consultation with local Rabbi Shaul Osadchey.  These projects are part of a series of projects that seek out local communities interested in supporting design research in the area of computation and digital fabrication techniques.

This project incorporates the mapping of the exodus into patterns that articulate the surface and act as a narrative device to describe the transient nature of that period.

Categories
Beakerhead Jason Johnson Kailey O'Farrell Kevin Spaans Max Senini

MYRTLE – Beakerhead 2014

Date: 2014
Client: Beakerhead
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Collaborators: Craig Leblanc, Nathan Tremblay
Project Budget: $6000
Research Assistants: Kevin Spaans, Kailey O’Farrell, Max Senini
Funding Agencies: Beakerhead

Project Developed as a small pavilion for the 2014 Beakerhead Festival.

Categories
Beth Tzedec Jason Johnson Kevin Spaans Kurtis Nishiyama Mahdiar Ghaffarian Michael Ting

Sukkah 2013:

Date: 2013
Client: Beth Tzedec Congregation, Calgary
Principal Investigator: Jason Johnson
Collaborator: Shaul Osadchey
Project Budget: $6000
Project Design/Build Team: Mahdiar Ghaffarian, Micheal Ting (Design & Fabrication) Kurtis Nishiyama, Kevin Spaans (Fabrication)
Funding Agencies: Beth Tzedec Congregation

Each year since 2012 a team of students has worked with the Beth Tzedec Congregation to design and build a sukkah.  A sukkah is a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish festival of Sukkot. Students spend a semester designing an building the project in consultation with local Rabbi Shaul Osadchey.  These projects are part of a series of projects that seek out local communities interested in supporting design research in the area of computation and digital fabrication techniques.

This proposal imagines the sukkah as a canyon in the desert and articulates the layering sandstone through a variably spaced series of horizontal planes.  The carved out space allows for inhabiting the sukkah which provides temporary shelter.

Categories
Alanna LaRose Alyssa Haas Beth Tzedec Jason Johnson Nadine Vroom

Sukkah 2012: Soupkah

Date: 2012
Client: Beth Tzedec Congregation, Calgary
Principal Investigators: Jason Johnson, Catherine Hamel
Collaborator: Shaul Osadchey
Project Budget: $6000
Project Design/Build Team: Alyssa Haas, Alanna LaRose,
Nadine Vroom
Funding Agencies: Beth Tzedec Congregation
Publications: Avenue Magazine May 21. 2013

Project Description: Each year since 2012 a team of students has worked with the Beth Tzedec Congregation to design and build a sukkah.  A sukkah is a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish festival of Sukkot. Students spend a semester designing an building the project in consultation with local Rabbi Shaul Osadchey.  These projects are part of a series of projects that seek out local communities interested in supporting design research in the area of computation and digital fabrication techniques.

“Collaborating with the Beth Tzedec Congregation and Rabbi Shaul Osadchey, students in the Masters of Architecture program worked to design a sukkah — a symbolic shelter in which Jews dwell and dine during the autumn harvest festival of Sukkot to represent the sheltering of the Israelites in the wilderness. Students designed 12 different sukkahs and one was selected for construction. The winning design, called the “soupka,” was created to incorporate the charitable aspect of the holiday and features round holes through which congregation members can deposit cans of soup and other foods to donate to charity. Local children enjoyed the participatory aspect of the design. “

Avenue Magazine May 21. 2013

Categories
Jason Johnson Jodi James Kurtis Nishiyama

AX2011: ACADIA 2011 Exhibit Wall

Date: 2011
Client: ACADIA Conference 2011
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Collaborators: FLATCUT_LLC
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants: Jodi James, Kurtis Nishiyama
Funding Agencies: ACADIA, FLATCUT_

Design for the ACADIA 2011 Project Exhibit.  Taking cues from localized cloud conditions and weather simulations, this project explores surface definition and articulation through the manipulation of flat stock materials.