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Beth Tzedec Brady Horner Jason Johnson Joshua Taron Kristen Forward Matthew Parker SSHRC

Sukkah No. 5: Subject to Change

Date: 2016
Client: Beth Tzedec Congregation
Principal Investigator(s): Joshua M. Taron, Jason S. Johnson
Project Budget: $5,000
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Kristen Forward, Brady Horner, Matthew Parker
Funding Agencies: Beth Tzedec Congregation, SSHRC

This 8’x8’x8’ digitally fabricated object is the fifth in a series of five sukkahs designed and built by the LID for Calgary’s Beth Tzedec Congregation. The three Hebrew characters for “sukkah” are projected onto each set of parallel planes of the sukkah, which, when modeled in three dimensions form a space for social gathering.

The sukkah is designed to sit in any one of three positions thus allowing for different orientations from year to year. Constructed of urethane –coated CNC milled EPS foam chunks bolted together at aluminum plates, the sukkah is light weight and can be easily transported and assembled by a team of 4-6 people. With that same group, assembly or disassembly can be achieved in about 20 minutes without the need for skilled labor. These aspects of the design improve the design’s discoverability and allowed the project to achieve a high degree of precision without the involvement of costly building contractors.


The Laboratory for Integrative Design (LID) embarked on a five year long Sukkah project in collaboration with the Beth Tzedec Congregation in 2012. This video captures our journey through the celebration of the Jewish holiday across these five years and across five LID designed and built community Sukkahs. These Sukkahs experimented with parametric design and rule-based systems exploring scale and material in a tangible way while still communicating a religious framework tied to celebration and gratitude.
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Alex Wilton Arole Oluwaseyi Guy Gardner Jason Johnson Matthew Parker SSHRC

The Crest & the Crown

Date: 2016
Client: cSpace King Edward
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Alex Wilton,
Oluwaseyi Arole, Guy Gardner, Matthew Parker
Funding Agencies: SSHRC

“The Crest and the Crown” is a proposal for the King Edward School C-Space project that includes a chandelier and panelized ceiling installation, forming an entry sequence to the historic school. The ceiling panels are a mixed construction of CNC milled repurposed wood (removed during the renovation), inlaid brass, and milled translucent panels mounted to a modular dropped ceiling system. The panels use the icon of the school crest taken from a drawing in a historic school yearbook transform it. The modules are mirrored and arrayed along their axes’ to produce a combined pattern. The materials of brass and wood are inspired by details, furniture, and accents found throughout the historic building.

The Crown is imagined as a glowing object suspended above an entryway. It is constructed of stacked translucent panels lit from the interior, and visible from below and through a window between the vestibule and the entry stairs. It formally links the interior and exterior elements of the proposal. The Crown references the colonial iconography of the historic building, digitally simulated with restrained inflation and contouring. The proposal for the exterior elements uses a similar workflow of translating 2d- patterns derived from historical data into 3d form.

Categories
Alex Wilton Competition Entries Guy Gardner Jason Johnson Matthew Parker Public Art SSHRC Uncategorized

Columnulous

Date: 2016
Client: cSpace King Edward
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Guy Gardner,
Matthew Parker, Alex Wilton
Funding Agencies: SSHRC
Status: Proposal

“Columnulous” is a series of vertical monuments resembling cloud formations, acting as a threshold for entry to the public plaza at the south entrance of the building. Each column is formed in precast concrete and is intended to weather in place. Details from the original 1912 architectural drawings of the sandstone building were sampled and projected onto masses using digital software. By referencing instances from the façade which could be seen from the locations where the columns were placed, the goal was to subconsciously and indirectly draw the viewers’ attention to the patterns contained within the building elevation.

The projected lines were used as restraints as the masses were inflated using a physics engine. The process of inflation could be seen as a way of obscuring or “clouding” these details, so that the viewer could feel free to overlay their own interpretations of the form, in the same way that we project images onto clouds. Several iterations were developed to explore the extent to which the geometries and patterns should be obscured in order to allow for a range of associations.

The experience of interacting with these intentionally ambiguous forms encourages a similar procedure of projecting meaning onto the work. The objects can be read a number of ways at the same time. They resemble both soft, fluid forms, and rigid concrete monoliths. They operate in series and as single sculptural instances. The inscribed patterns reference the adjacent building, but are obscured.

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Alex Wilton Anson Tse Beakerhead Christina James Guy Gardner Hayden Pattullo Jason Johnson Logan Armstrong Mariana Ibanez Matthew Parker Simon Kim SSHRC

Light Shells – Lamp Workshop

Date: 2016
Client: Beakerhead
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Project Budget: $1500
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Matthew Parker, Christina James, Logan Armstrong, Guy Gardner, Alex Wilton, Kim Tse, Hayden Pattullo
Funding Agencies: SSHRC, Beakerhead

Light Shells is a continuing exploration into thin shell structural assemblies.  The project team developed a number of strategies based on the surface breakdown techniques from the Sputnik and Nancy prototypes and stitching logics used in prior investigations.  A user interface was developed to allow for versioning of the project through variations in formal logics and surface articulation.

The project team then tested this interface on a number of groups with varying levels of design experience and exposure to generative digital tools.  The results shown here are from a two session workshop held in January of 2016.  The first session asked the 14 participants tasked with making a series of constrained design decisions that generate the lamps and their cut files.  In the second session participants assembled their lamps.  Assembly time varies from 1 hour to the full 3 hours allotted for completion.

Future workshops will introduce more variables into the design process and streamline the assembly to optimize the number of surface to surface connection points.

Categories
Beakerhead Canadian Heritage Christina James Jason Johnson Logan Armstrong Mariana Ibanez Matthew Parker Simon Kim SSHRC

The Ministers _ Nancy

Date: 2015
Client: Beakerhead
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Collaborators: Simon Kim, Mariana Ibanez
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Christina James,
Matthew Parker, Logan Armstrong
Funding Agencies: SSHRC, Canadian Heritage Foundation

Project Description: Part of an installation at Beakerhead 2015 called The Ministers, Nancy is an investigation of a self-supporting thin shell structure lit from within. The piece anchored the Beakernight event as an object to draw visitors into the space from the main street. This project was designed in collaboration with Mariana Ibanez and Simon Kim of IK Studio. The design focused on using various types of flat stock plastics to explore the limits of double curvature.

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Beakerhead Canadian Heritage Christina James Jason Johnson Logan Armstrong Mariana Ibanez Matthew Parker Simon Kim SSHRC

The Ministers _ Sputnik

Date: 2015
Client: Beakerhead
Principal Investigator: Jason S. Johnson
Collaborators: Simon Kim, Mariana Ibanez
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Christina James ,
Matthew Parker, Logan Armstrong

Project Description: Part of an installation at Beakerhead 2015 called The Ministers, Sputnik is an investigation of thin shell structures produced by conic geometries. This project was designed in collaboration with Mariana Ibanez and Simon Kim of IK Studio. The design team focused on iteratively prototyping this project across materials and techniques. The final object was produced in thin shell aluminum from flat sheet material.

Categories
Christina James Jason Johnson Joshua Taron Logan Armstrong Matthew Parker Nicholas Perseo SSHRC

FXAT SCREEN: RAIC Festival Pavilion

Date: 2015
Client: RAIC Festival/MBAC
Principal Investigators: Jason S. Johnson, Joshua M. Taron
Consultants:Entuitive (Engineering)
Project Budget: $20,000
Research Assistants/ Project Team : Matthew Parker,
Logan Armstrong, Christina James, Nicholas Perseo
Funding Agencies/Sponsors: SSHRC, CMLC, MBAC,
Meadow Sage Builders, Clark Builders, EVDS University of Calgary

Project Description: The Flat Screen TV seeks to reclaim the presence of architecture and its imagery in the public realm. CNC milled opaque plywood panels expose a depth to the otherwise thin planar surfaces revealing lit polyethylene panels beneath. This artificial topography is wrapped around a cantilevered form that addresses both the pedestrian corridor of Stephen Ave directly across and the RAIC Design Hub. A gradient of openings migrate across the form toward the street, concluding with a 14 x 7 foot rear projection screen showing the work of 15 young Canadian architecture firms in the RAIC’s Future Voice: Situating Architecture Exhibition curated by Marc Boutin of MBAC.

Given tight time and budget constraints we deployed a “rough cut” technique that exposed the seams of the panels and the material layers embedded in the marine plywood. This technique produces a contrast between the high definition images projected on the content surface and the rough nature of the milled surfaces.

Categories
Andrea Patry Kevin Spaans Matthew Parker Vera Parlac

Soft Agile Spaces

Date: 2014
Client: n/a
Principal Investigator: Vera Parlac
Collaborators: n/a
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Matt Parker,
Andrea Patry, Kevin Spaans
Sponsors: University of Calgary Seed Grant
Publications:  “Material as Mechanism in Agile Spaces”, in B.Kolarevic and V. Parlac Building Dynamics: Exploring Architecture of Change, United States, Routledge, June 2015

Project Description: Soft Agile Spaces project relies on non-mechanical material-based actuation using shape memory alloy springs (SMA) that are integrated into the structural lattice of the surfaces. The movement resulting from the material-based actuation of the lattice is augmented by an inflatable soft robot surface that extends the lattice system. The network of sensors distributed throughout the surface serves to enable information exchange between the surface, environment, and people. The Soft Agile Space project proposes an adaptable and responsive building envelope capable of sensing its environment and responding to it by changing its shape or revealing small occupiable spaces to passers-by. These spaces can provide shelter or mediate the temperature of the environment, making public spaces in harsh, cold climates more vibrant.

The “intelligence” of the surface’s physical environment is capable of incorporating climate and human-related conditions into its working. By sensing the environmental temperature, the surface can mediate between the internal and external environments.

Categories
Matthew Parker Vera Parlac

Agile Spaces

Date: 2013
Client: n/a
Principal Investigator: Vera Parlac
Collaborators: n/a
Project Budget: Withheld
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Matt Parker
Sponsors: University of Calgary Seed Grant
Publications: “Agile Spaces” published in the Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA): Adaptive Architecture, University of Waterloo, Cambridge, Ontario, 2013
Agile Spaces/ Iconic/ SKiN“, Responsive Architecture Research Team V. Parlac and B. Kolarevic, in Facing the Future, Exhibition Book, 2nd International Scientific Conference and Exhibition, Gallery of Science and Technology, Belgrade, Serbia, 2014

The backbone of this project is a kinetic material system actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) springs. The material system is developed both as a physical and digital prototype. Its behavior is examined at a physical level and the findings are used to digitally simulate behavior of the larger system. The system utilizes a lattice structure and its structural behavior. It relies on elastic deformation of the constituent members, which allows the forces of bending to be distributed along a wider region of the surface. The system becomes kinetic when the SMA spring actuators are activated. Activation of the springs introduces tension into the lattice members that causes change in the geometry of the lattice cells. The result of this is bending of the wider region of the surface. The lattice can be actuated in the lower or upper zone. Depending on the zone of actuation the lattice deforms and moves upwards or downwards. The contraction of the SMA spring produces a tension in the middle layer of the lattice, which manifests through the deformation of the cell structure, bending an entire region of the lattice. Strategic placement of the actuators across the lattice produces accumulated bending effect and deforms the entire surface.

Categories
Jason Johnson Jodi James Joshua Taron Matthew Parker

RE:Connect Devington

Date: 2010
Client: Devington Communities Association
Principal Investigators: Jason Johnson, Joshua Taron
Collaborators: Wil Marquez (W/Purpose)
Project Budget: n/a
Research Assistants/ Project Team: Jodi James, Matthew Parker
Funding Agencies: URGC/University of Calgary

Re:Connect Devington is a proposal for adaptive reuse of an abandoned railroad corridor in Indianapolis.  The project deploys cellular patterns and swarming structures to produce an urban agricultural park. Circulation, structure and program are distributed via a parametric cellular system and connected through swarming protocols.