Categories
Competition Entries Guy Gardner Jason Johnson JP Hammill Public Art SSHRC Uncategorized

Biomorph

Date: 2017
Client: Edmonton Arts Council
Principal Investigator(s): Jason S. Johnson, Guy Gardner
Research Assistant: JP Hammill
Funding Agencies: SSHRC
Budget: N/A
Status: Proposal

We approach this work through the lens of capturing motion. Transit stations are places of constant motion and change in ways that are highly visible to the observer. We propose a project that captures this sense of motion and uses its physical characteristics as a way to make that motion felt on the site. The built environment, although it appears static, is in a constant state of movement as it shifts to accommodate fluctuating temperatures, wind and precipitation. This piece accepts these changes and in fact uses them to create a constantly shifting presence in the urban landscape.

Biormorph abstracts and embeds the signatures of the site users (human and non-human) into the surface of the canopy. As a proposal for the Muttart stop of Edmonton’s new Valley Ridge LRT line, its reference to vaguely human and animal forms in motion visually activates the canopy of the building. The pattern compresses and overlays the built up index of the activities and movement patterns of the site and functions as fossil of its history. Seasonal precipitation in the form of rain and snow and the changing light qualities of the Alberta landscape interact with the piece to form new patterns readings of the work. The changing aspects of the piece also reference the plant collections of the Muttart, which are always in states of change.

Categories
Competition Entries Guy Gardner Hayden Pattullo Jason Johnson Public Art SSHRC Uncategorized

Floq

Date: 2017
Client: Edmonton Arts Council
Principal Investigator(s): Jason S. Johnson, Guy Gardner
Research Assistant:  Hayden Pattullo
Funding Agencies: SSHRC
Budget: N/A
Status: Proposal

The project is composed of a field of brightly coloured discs attached to a grid of thin wires in such a way as to allow the discs to flutter in the wind, reflect light and produce patterns on the spaces around them. The technique is such that we can experiment with various iterations of pattern and symbols in the consultation, design, and fabrication process. FloQ captures the ways in which we move and evolve cities and cultures in response to the one another and the conditions that surround us.